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Retrieverfalcon

Set 10152

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Anyone know the distinction between sets 10152-1, 10152-2 and 10252-3? They contain identical parts and the only difference I can see is in their name but this doesn't seem to be reflected anywhere else. When this set was re-released as 10155, there were at least a few mold changes. 

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The BL pages have good descriptions explaining the difference. Essentially is mostly due to different packaging when it was re-released over the years. Maersk also has a corporate change which affected the set. 

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Thank you. Looking at those notes, it appears the inventories will vary slightly for the 2006 version (10152-3) once we add stickers to the database (I'll submit CRs for those shortly) due to the name change from Maersk Sealand to Maersk Line. The only distinction between the -1 and -2 versions appears to be in packaging (they use the same stickers) so I'll suggest some note language to reflect that distinction. 

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Is this the only set where the set number changed when the packaging changed? Tower bridge for instance had a packaging refresh but is still 10214-1.

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No. While I am not sure it is comprehensive, one of the best listings I've found of these type changes is at https://brickset.com/sets/list-18333. The decision seems to have been made case-by-case by LEGO depending on how extensive the production change was. For example, WALL-E (21303) was fairly extensive but retained its set number. The changes to Shuttle Adventure (10213) were enough however to re-release the set as Shuttle Expedition (10231) - both a number and name change but with the contents of 10213 and its supplementary parts.

The history of the Maersk 10152/10155 is more extensive however due to changes in plans regarding the Maersk Blue ABS parts. Best as I've been able to piece together, the 2004 version (10152-1) used the last of the Maersk Blue ABS pellets in LEGO's inventory. Remember that Maersk Blue is a trademarked color of the shipping company and therefore wasn't used for any other LEGO purposes. However, LEGO outdid themselves in the design of 10152-1 and it sold like crazy (quickly selling out of the 10,000 sets allocated to LEGO [email protected] globally - another 4,000 sets were sent to Maersk for distribution to employees, contractors, etc as Maersk deemed fit). So much so, that LEGO wanted to continue with release of a modified colorway of the same set and held polls and internal discussions about switching to either Dark Blue or Dark Green to replace the Maersk Blue parts with Dark Blue being the most likely final decision. This activity likely led to some of the artwork that was used in the 2005 version. However, before this colorway ever entered production, Maersk agreed to pay for more ABS pellets for another production run which turned into 10152-2. To partially address legal questions over the announcements that 10152-1 would be the last-ever Maersk Blue parts and that it was a limited edition, LEGO shifted up the packaging for the 2005 release but reused everything else - parts, instructions, stickers, etc. However, since the new parts were made from a new batch of ABS pellets some consider this a slightly different shade from the original. I haven't found production numbers on 10152-2 and LEGO never a specific amount (likely due to the backlash over the previous year's "Limited Edition"). In 2006, Maersk requested a variant with the stickers and box re-branded to reflect the name change of the company from Maersk Sealand to Maersk Line. This version was only provided to Maersk (it was never officially sold via [email protected] but likely a few slipped out). By this point, the stock of 2x4 3001 bricks produced for the 10152-2 sets was running low, so rather than do a very low-volume production run just to make more, corporate contacted LEGO model shops at the various Legolands and obtained an old stock of 3001a 2x4 Maersk Blue Bricks (likely initially produced some time prior to 1990) and used those to complete the production run of 10152-3. A few years later, in 2010, with demand still high for a Maersk ship, LEGO released the 10152-3 version of the design to the general public, including a production run of new 3001 2x4 bricks. Likely, the demand for parts for 10155 and the 10219 Maersk Train was sufficient in quantity to justify the production run that hadn't be done in 2006. However, by the time of this re-release in 2010, thirteen parts in the original set had been redesigned and the newer mold variants were used (you can run a set compare on Rebrickable between 10152-3 and 10155 to see this list). This increased the set's part count by 2 since a twice-used window/glass combo that was considered as one part in 2006 was produced as two distinct parts in 2010. They also increased the price point by almost $45 between the 2004/2005 general release and the 2010 one. Apparently, the change in Maersk branding, part mound changes and price increase were enough in LEGO's corporate decision making to warrant a new set number. The last of the newer-batch of Maersk Blue ABS pellets paid for by Maersk in 2005 (as far as everyone knows) were used to produce the 10219 Maersk Train in 2011 (retired in 2012). When a new Maersk ship, the 10241 Maersk Line Triple-E, was released in 2014, a shift was made to Medium Azure (a color not-exclusive to Maersk and still in production today).

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